Throwback Children’s Books (Part Two)

Recently I gave a list of children’s books I read repeatedly as a child, and still like to give as suggestions to children looking for something new to read. Here is a continuation of that list. Like last time, feel free to share your own favorite childhood books in the comments!

Eleven by Lauren Myracle
I got my copy of Eleven in a Barnes & Noble summer reading challenge. Each chapter of Eleven focuses on a distinct event from each month of the year. The stories were funny and frequently reminded me of my own experiences. Myracle puts in a lot of effort to ensure even the smallest details are vivid and memorable. The series in general (especially follow-up books Twelve and Thirteen) is a great, relatable example of tween fiction. Continue reading “Throwback Children’s Books (Part Two)”

Reviewing Raina Telgemeier

Raina Telgemeier is one of the most asked after authors in the children’s area of the library. It’s understandable too. She wrote Smile, and ever-popular award-winning book, revamped the 90s era Baby-sitter’s Club series in graphic novel format and wrote Ghosts, a recent publication and one of the CPL 2017/2018 Battle of the Books titles. Upon checking out Drama this month, my reading of each of Telgemeier’s original works is complete.

Smile
My life is one dental incident after another. I had multiple dental surgeries as part of the braces process and the struggle continues even now, as I am in-between procedures for getting a permanent crown attached to a tooth I broke as a child. For those reasons, I knew I would love Smile before I read it. It is a book about a girl who undergoes a dental tragedy, and consequently faces many dental surgeries as well as teasing for her smile’s condition. I even extend my deep connection to the story to the author herself, as this dental nightmare is a semi-autobiographical story. My only regret is that this book didn’t exist when I was younger… Continue reading “Reviewing Raina Telgemeier”

Throwback Children’s Books (Part One)

Working in the children’s section at a library has introduced me to a realm of books that either didn’t exist when I was child, or weren’t on my radar. Even with this new world of books added to my list of books to recommend—I plan to read & review some of these books soon!—there are older children’s books (at least a decade old or more) I still suggest if it sounds like it fits a customer’s criteria. There are so many, in fact, that I had to turn this into a two-part post. Share your favorite books from your childhood in the comments, and stay tuned for part two!

Princess Academy by Shannon Hale
Everything about this book deserved my adoration. It was one of few books I read as a child that brought me into the world of fantasy. Part of the reason I didn’t read fantasy is because magic and myth, with the exception of the Harry Potter series, wasn’t quite the phenomenon with children it is now. I also, however, didn’t read fantasy because I didn’t like it as much as a child. Most of my reading was mystery and/or realistic fiction. My almost exclusive fascination with Princess Academy in the fantasy genre is probably why I’ve branched out to reading almost nothing but fantasy as an adult. Even as an adult, Princess Academy remains one my favorite books. Continue reading “Throwback Children’s Books (Part One)”

A Selection of Silly Picture Books

Chicken Butt’s Back! by Erica S. Perl
Check out this book if you want something with simple word play. In this book, a clever child sets his mom up for repeated embarrassment. As one sentence ends with an animal, the next sentence starts with “but.” “deer. But…” becomes, in the mind of the child, “deer butt.” So does everything else that meets this pattern. The colors are vibrant, which goes well with the jokes the story portrays. It follows a very childish premise, but ultimately creates many laughs. Continue reading “A Selection of Silly Picture Books”

Looking for Alaska by John Green

Reviewing Looking for Alaska is relevant for two reasons. The first is that John Green has a new book coming out next month called Turtles All the Way Down. [His older books are likely receiving a resurgence in popularity because of Turtles All the Way Down.] It’s also Banned Books Week in the U.S., and Looking for Alaska is a frequently challenged book as reported by ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. It made the Top 10 Most Challenged Books list in 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016, with the book taking the number one spot in 2015.

Continue reading “Looking for Alaska by John Green”