Free Comic Book Day Spotlight: Women in Comics

March is Women’s History Month. All month long, we celebrate our heroines and the amazing women in our lives. Traditionally, comics has been seen as the purview of men, but women have always contributed in a variety of ways from creating to writing to editing to drawing to inking to everything in-between. The women of comics should not be underestimated. Enjoy the creators and characters with these titles:



Becky Cloonan                    Kelly Sue DeConnick                 Gail Simone


Noelle Stevenson                     Jill Thompson



Batgirl                                      Batwoman                             Harley Quinn


Ironheart                                     Jessica Jones                     Mockingbird


Ms. Marvel                                   Paper Girls                       Persepolis


Princess Jellyfish                              Silk                              Wonder Woman

Free Comic Book Day is Saturday, May 5, 2018 at the Indian River Library from 10:30 am to 4:00 pm. Join us for free comic books, panels, activities, and more!

DC Icons Series

2016 brought the announcement of the DC Icons series, a new young adult series focusing on famed DC comic characters, penned by best-selling YA authors. The topic alone was not enough to enthuse me–I don’t read many comics, nor novels based on comics–but the authors starting out the series did.

The authors include Leigh Bardugo (Grishaverse) on a Wonder Woman title, Marie Lu (Legend, Young Elites) on a Batman title, Sarah J. Maas (Throne of Glass, A Court of Thorns and Roses) on Catwoman and Matt de la Peña (Last Stop on Market Street) on Superman. Continue reading “DC Icons Series”

200 Years of Frankenstein: This Monstrous Thing

Way back on the first of January, 1818, a slim, but riveting novel about a mad scientist and his monstrous creation was released to the public. It was called Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, and is thought by many to be the first true science fiction novel. By 1823, Mary Wolstencraft Shelley was finally credited as the author, earning her lasting fame and an endless stream of imitators.

Victor Frankenstein and his monster have been adapted into film and television almost as many times as Bram Stoker’s Dracula, iconic cinematic characters that keep Halloween stores stocked and profitable, and Gothic horror fans like me always hunting for more. In honor of Shelley’s contribution to Gothic literature, which turns 200 this year, I decided to look at a remarkable reinvention of the same story: This Monstrous Thing by Mackenzi Lee.

Book Cover: This Monstrous Thing by Mackenzi Lee

Continue reading “200 Years of Frankenstein: This Monstrous Thing”