In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall III

Jimmy McClean is three parts Lakota Indian on his Mother’s side  and one part white on his Father’s side.  The problem, for Jimmy, is that the white is all that shows. With his light hair and blue eyes, he doesn’t seem to fit in.   His grandfather, Nyles High Eagle, takes him on a trip where he learns about his Lakota heritage and about the great Lakota hero, Tasunke Witko – known to us as “Crazy Horse”.

Jimmy’s grandfather takes him to a monument that marks the site of a great battle.  The Lakota people called it the Battle of the Hundred in the Hand, but in history books it is called the Fetterman Massacre because it was written by white people.  In reality, what he did was take up arms against the United States Federal government to fight against encroachments on the territories and way of life of the Lakota people, including acting as a decoy in the Fetterman Massacre and leading a war party to victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in June 1876.

Most stories about Native Americans are romantic tales of brave warriors riding horses, hunting buffalo, and leading savage war parties.   Jimmy learns what real war is like and about who the real “savages” were.  He finds out that who tells the history matters. He also discovers that Crazy Horse had light-colored hair like him!  Appearances and names do not matter, it is what is inside of us that says who we are.

 

 

 

About the Author

Joseph Marshall III, was raised on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and is a member of the Sicangu Lakota (Rosebud Sioux) tribe.

 

Books About Native Americans

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

Moccasin Thunder by Lori Marie Carlson

Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee by Dee Brown

Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac

The Round House by Louis Erdrich

Girl of the Shining Mountains by Peter Roop

Thirteen Moons by Charles Frazier

On The Rez by Ian Frazier

Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

Sing Down the Moon by Scott O’Dell

 

Alice

Born to read, forced to work.

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